Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • Emory University: M.A. 1990, Ph.D. 1992.
  • Doctoral Dissertation: Skepticism and the Promise of Philosophy: An Essay on the Pyrrhonism of David Hume. Director: Professor Donald W. Livingston. An interpretation of Hume’s skepticism, assessing its roots in Hellenistic thought and an appraisal of the skeptical vision of philosophical activity. Announced in the Review of Metaphysics 44.1 no. 181 (September 1992): 215.
  • Bucknell University: B.A. Philosophy, B.A. Economics, 1985, Summa cum laude. Honors Thesis: “Situating Economics: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Social Science.” Directors: Professor Joseph P. Fell, Professor Richard Fleming, and Professor Francis Wilson. Founder and editor of Eidos: The Bucknell Academic Journal (1984–86).
  • Université Stendhal (Grenoble III), Centre Universitaire d’Etudes Françaises (July 1988).
  • Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Deutschkurse für Auslander (July–August 1987).
  • London School of Economics (L.S.E.) (Lent Term 1984).

Areas of Specialization                    

Hume, Skepticism, Early Modern Philosophy

Areas of Competence 

History of Western Philosophy, Logic, Environmental Philosophy, Political Philosophy

Current and Recent Professional Posts

  • Professor of Philosophy (1998–) & Chair (1999-2009; 2011–13, 2014–17), Transylvania University
  • Chair of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, (PPE, 2012–13, 2014–17), Transylvania University
  • Editor-in-Chief of academic journal, Cogent Arts & Humanities, and editor of the journal’s component Cogent Arts & Humanities: Philosophy & Religion, published through Taylor & Francis (2014–)
  • Editorial Board, Conversations: The Journal of Cavellian Studies (2019–)
  • Professor of Philosophy, Kentucky Institute for International Studies (KIIS): Istanbul (2010) and Barcelona (2019)
  • Contributing Editor, The Philosophers’ Magazine (2003–09)
  • Director of Bingham-Young program on “Liberty, Security, and Justice” (2004–06)
  • Panelist on “AskPhilosophers.Org” (2005–).

 Fellowships and Grants

  • 2017–18 John William Miller Fellowship ($45,000)
  • 2016 Byron and Judy Gains Young Faculty Fellowship ($4,000)
  • 2013–14 David Hume Fellowship, Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH), University of Edinburgh (£10,000)
  • 2013–14 and 2006–07 Sabbatical Grants, Transylvania University ($10,000 each)
  • 2012 Byron Young Grant for participation in CIEE program in Cuba ($5,000)
  • 1990–91 Fulbright Fellowship to the United Kingdom, visiting student at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Selected Honors and Awards

  • 2016 Invited lecture before the faculty and students of the University of Abuja in Abuja, Nigeria.
  • 2014 Non-fiction finalist for the Pushcart Prize XXXVIII recognizing “important work published by small presses,” for my Salmagundi essay, “American Despair in an Age of Hope.”
  • 2007 Featured speaker for the Kentucky Humanities Council.
  • 2006 Acorn Award, from the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education and the Governor’s Conference on Postsecondary Education Trusteeship for outstanding professor at a Kentucky public or independent college or university ($5,000).
  • 2005 Professor of the Year, Transylvania University.
  • 2004–06 Bingham-Young Professorship.
  • 1998, 2003, 2008, 2013, 2019 Bingham Award for Teaching Excellence.

 Publications: Books and Special Journal Issues

Publications: Articles & Anthology Contributions

  • [Invited.] “Hume’s Teresic Political Skepticism,” in Skepticism in the History of Philosophy: A Pan-American Dialogue, edited by Plínio Smith and Vincente Raga. Dortrecht: Springer.  [Forthcoming.]
  • With Catherine Fosl, “Milton Rogovin and the Popular Front,” in The Photography of Milton Rogovin, edited by Christopher Fulton (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 2019), 89–97. ISBN 978-0-8131-7748-9.
  • [Invited.] “Skepticism in Hume’s Politics and Histories,” Araucaria: Revista Iberoamericana de Filosofía Política y Humanidades, 20.40 (2018): 371–401. A special issue edited by Gerardo Lopez Sastre.
  • “‘You Don’t Know Who You Are’: Imagining the Self in the Films of Christopher Nolan,” in The Philosophy of Christopher Nolan, edited by George Dunn and Jason Eberl (Lanham: Lexington Books, 2017), 167–78. ISBN 978-1-4985-1352-4.
  • The Many Voices of Interdisciplinarity,” preface to the special article collection in Cogent Arts & Humanities 3: 1164949 (April 2016).
  • “Style in Teaching Philosophy,” in Commonplace Commitments: Thinking through the Legacy of Joseph P. Fell, edited by idem, Michael McGandy & Mark Moorman (Baltimore/Lewisburg: Rowan-Littlefield/Bucknell University Press, 2016), 31–42.
  • “Placing Common Life,” in Commonplace Commitments: Thinking through the Legacy of Joseph P. Fell, edited by idem, Michael McGandy & Mark Moorman (Baltimore/Lewisburg: Rowan-Littlefield/Bucknell University Press, 2016), 87–104.
  • “Motherhood and Apple Pie,” in Justified and Philosophy, edited by Robert Arp (Chicago: Open Court, 2015) 171–92.
  • [Invited.] “Scepticism and Naturalism in Cavell and Hume,” in Stanley Cavell and Skepticism, a special issue of the International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 5.1 (2015): 29–54; edited by Duncan Pritchard and Diego E. Machuca for the series, Brill Studies in Skepticism (Leiden: Brill).
  • Natural Doubts and the Recovery of the Ordinary in Hume and Cavell” in Conversations: The Journal of Cavellian Studies 3 (2015): 32–48. Also here.
  • [Invited.] “Sons of History: How SAMCRO Lost and then Found its Way,” in Sons of Anarchy and Philosophy, edited by George Dunn and Jason Eberl (Malden: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013), 189-200. ISBN 978-1118641576.
  • [Invited.] “Anarchy and Authenticity: Why SAMCRO Shouldn’t Fight History,” in Sons of Anarchy and Philosophy, edited by George Dunn and Jason Eberl (Malden: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013), 201-13. ISBN 978-1118641576.
  • [Invited] “Habit, Custom, History, and Hume’s Critical Philosophy,” in A History of Habit: From Aristotle to Bourdieu, edited by Tom Sparrow and Adam Hutchinson (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2013), 133-51; ISBN 978-0-7391-8199-7. Also published in Studies in Early Modern Philosophy, Volume 7, David Hume on His 300th Birthday, edited by Stanley Tweyman (Ann Arbor, MI: Caravan Books, 2013).
  • With James Miller, “Surveillance Erodes our Protections,” The Courier-Journal, op-ed front page, 30 June 2013.
  • “American Despair in an Age of Hope” in Salmagundi 176 (Fall 2012): 99–126. Commentary by Stewart Justman (University of Montana), “Abusing the Dead,” 127–37; with my reply, 138–43. Non-fiction finalist for the 2014 Pushcart Prize XXXVIII recognizing “important works published by small presses.”
  • With Evan Brown, “Bowling, Despair, and American Nihilism,” in The Big Lebowski and Philosophy, edited by Peter S. Fosl (Malden, MA: Wiley, 2012), 147–58.
  • Four entries in the Encyclopedia of the American Enlightenment, edited by Mark G. Spencer (Bristol: Thoemmes Press, 2012).
    • Joseph Buchanan
    • Daniel Drake
    • Constantine Samuel Rafinesque
  • Seven entries in Alexander George with Elisa Mai, eds., What Should I Do? (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011): sado-masochism (pp. 19–20), sincerity (p. 36), death (pp. 48–49); medical ethics (pp. 65-66); duties to others (pp. 91–92); animal ethics (pp. 106–07); law and religion (pp. 112–14). ISBN: 978-0199586127.
  • “Skepticism and Naturalism in Hume,” in Skepticism, volume 5 of Topics in Contemporary Philosophy, edited by Joseph Keim Campbell and Michael O’Rourke (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2010), 301–32 (Chapter 5). ISBN 978-0-262-51396-8. A revised version published as “Skepticism and the Possibility of Nature” in Pyrrhonism in Ancient, Modern, and Contemporary Philosophy, edited by Diego R. Machuca (New York: Springer, 2011), 145–70 (Chapter 8). ISBN 978-94-007-1990-3.
  • “Joseph Buchanan: American Psychologist,” Transylvania Treasures 2.2 (Summer, 2009), 10–11.
  • With Eli Fosl, “Vampire Dämmerung: What Can Twilight Tell Us about God?” in Twilight and Philosophy, edited by Rebecca Housel and J. Jeremy Wisnewski (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2009), 63-78. ISBN 978-0-470-48423-4.
  • “Should John Connor Save the World?” in The Terminator and Philosophy, edited by Richard Brown (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2009), 218-35. ISBN 978-0470-44798-7.
  • “Show Me the Money.” Forum on “Secrets of Philosophy” in The Philosophers’ Magazine 44 (1st Quarter 2009), 81–82.
  • “Are the Heroes Really Good?” in Heroes and Philosophy, edited by David Johnson (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2008). ISBN 978-0-470-37338-5.
  • “Philosophy and Rock and Roll” in Meϕisto 1.2 (October 2007), 4–5. A publication of the Universidad de Madrid.
  • “Richard Rorty.” [in memoriam] The Philosophers’ Magazine 39 (Fall 2007), 6-8.
  • “Friends and Enemies in the State of Nature: The Absence of Hobbes and the Presence of Schmitt,” in Lost and Philosophy, edited by Sharon Kaye (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2007), 159-76 (Chapter 14); ISBN 978-1-4051-6315-6. Second edition (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons, 2011), pp. 164-86. ISBN 978-0-470-63229-1.
  • Four entries (on war, race, death, and medical ethics) in, What Would Socrates Say? Philosophers Answer Your Questions About Love, Nothingness, and Everything Else, edited by Alexander George (New York: Clarkson Potter, 2007), pp. 100–02, 116–17, 150-51, 210-11; ISBN 978-307-35127-2. Also published as I Am, Therefore I Think: Philosophers Answer Your Questions about Love, Nothingness, and Everything Else, edited by Alexander George (London: Sceptre, 2007), 108-11, 123-25, 245-46, 247-48; ISBN 978-0-340-93789-1.
  • “The Immorality of Morality,” in Metallica and Philosophy, edited by William Irwin (Malden, MA: Basil Blackwell, Ltd.. 2007), 74-86; ISBN 978-1-4051-6348-4. Also published on www.secularhumaism.org. Reprinted in Introducing Philosophy through Pop Culture: From Socrates to South Park, from Hume to House, edited by William Irwin and David Kyle Johnson (Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010), 185–93. ISBN 978-1444334531.
  • “Righteous Blasphemy,” The Philosophers’ Magazine 35 (Third Quarter 2006): 70–77, with readers’ responses and author’s replies. Published online by TPM, as well; re-published on biologist and evolutionary theorist Richard Dawkins’s web site (www.richarddawkins.net), article 100; lampooned in a cartoon appearing at www.jesusandmo.net; discussed on various web sites across Europe, including the United Kingdom, Spain, Slovenia, Romania., and Scandinavia.
  • Entry on “John Duns Scotus” in Great Thinkers A-Z, edited by Julian Baggini and Jeremy Stangroom (New York & London: Continuum International Publishing, 2004), 221–22. ISBN 0-9264-7326-1.
  • Entry on “Michel de Montaigne” in Great Thinkers A-Z, edited by Julian Baggini and Jeremy Stangroom (New York & London: Continuum International Publishing, 2004), 163-64. ISBN 0-9264-7326-1.
  • The Conceptual Carvery [A serial column on philosophical issues appearing in The Philosophers’ Magazine:]
    • “A New Series on How to Make those Vital Conceptual Distinctions: Conditionals,” Issue 21 (1st quarter 2003) 54
    • “On Telling Madonna’s Essence from her Accidents,” 22 (2nd quarter 2003) 51
    • “Thinking on and off your Butt,” 23 (3rd quarter 2003) 56
    • “It’s All Absolutely Relative,” 24 (4th quarter 2003) 56
    • “Helping You Through Thick and Thin,” 25 (1st quarter 2004) 50
    • “When to be a Realist and When Not to,” 26 (2nd quarter 2004) 56
    • “On What is Necessary and Sufficient,” 27 (3rd quarter 2004) 56
    • “Distinguishing between Types and Tokens,” 28 (4th quarter 2004) 86
    • “On Sense and Reference,” 29 (1st quarter 2005) 85
    • “Describing Acquaintance and Description,” 30 (2rd quarter 2005) 85
    • “Semantics and Syntax,” 31 (3rd quarter 2005) 85
    • “Distinguishing the Necessary and the Contingent,” 32 (4th quarter 2005) 83
    • “Know your Posterior from Your A Posteriori,” 33 (1st quarter 2006) 78
    • “Unfeasible Clarity on Defeasibility,” 34 (2rd quarter 2006) 82
    • “Objective Explanations of the Subjective,” 35 (3rd quarter 2006) 82
    • “Facts with Value,” 36 (4th quarter 2006) 83
    • “Why you Can’t Make a Valid Point,” 37 (1st quarter 2007) 79
    • “Three Degrees of Possibility,” 38 (2nd quarter 2007) 79
    • “ How to Correctly Hold Hume’s Fork,” 39 (3rd quarter 2007) 79
    • “ All Other Things Being Equal, That Is,” 40 (1st quarter 2008) 79.
  • “Cracks in the Cement of the Universe: Hume, Science, and Skepticism.” In Imagining Science: Expressions of New Knowledge in the “Long” Eighteenth Century, edited by Kevin L. Cope and Robert C. Leitz (New York: AMS Press, 2002), 257–90. [Part of a Festschrift collected in honor of the opening of the Noel Collection of 18th-century documents and artifacts.] ISBN 0-404-63543-1.
  • “The Editor’s Tale,” The Philosophers’ Magazine 18 (Spring 2002), 46.
  • “David Hume,” in British Philosophers, 1500-1899, co-edited with Philip B. Dematteis, volume 252 of the Dictionary of Literary Biography (Detroit & London: Gale Research, Inc., 2002), 195–223. ISBN 0-7876-4669-5.
  • Six entries, Makers of Western Culture 1800-1914: A Biographical Dictionary of Literary Influences, edited by Derek Blakeley and John Powell (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000). ISBN 0-313-30422-X:
    • Mikhail Bakunin (pp. 30–32)
    • August Bebel (39–40)
    • Georg Cantor (72–73)
    • Fyodor Dostoevsky (132–34)
    • Johann Gottlieb Fichte (154–56)
    • Arthur Schopenhauer (363–65).
  • “Teaching Early Modern Women Philosophers,” in Crossing Boundaries: Attending to Early Modern Women, edited by Jane Donawerth & Adele Seef (Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, 2010; Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2000), 282–83. ISBN 978-0874-13745-3.
  • Interview with Alvin Plantinga on the topic of philosophy and religion. The Philosophers’ Magazine 10 (Spring 2000): 48–50.
  • “Animality and Common Life in Hume,” 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 4 (1999): 93–120.
  • “Hume, Skepticism, and Early American Deism,” Hume Studies 25.1&2 (April/November 1999): 171–192.
  • Interview with Richard Rorty on the topic of realism. The Philosophers’ Magazine 8 (Autumn 1999): 40–42.
  • Snapshot of David Hume, in The Philosophers’ Magazine 5 (Winter 1999): 31.
  • Review essay on Donald W. Livingston’s Philosophical Melancholy and Delirium: Hume’s Pathology of Philosophy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998) in Hume Studies 24.2 (November 1998): 355–66.
  • “The Bibliographic Bases of Hume’s Understanding of Sextus Empiricus and Pyrrhonism,” Journal of the History of Philosophy 16.2 (April 1998): 93–109. Abstract published in The Review of Metaphysics 52.1 no. 205 (September 1998): 204.
  • “The Moral Imperative to Rebel against God,” The Philosophers’ Magazine 2 (Spring 1998): 18-24. Responses to readers’ letters appear in Issue 3 (Summer 1998), 20–24, and online. An electronic version was published at http://www.philosophers.co.uk/. The article has also been published in Cogito 11.3 (December 1997): 141–50. The essay has been translated and published in Philosophy in Action, edited and translated by Pedro Galvão (Lisbon, Portugal: Gradiva Publishers, 2000).
  • “Stanley Cavell: A Bibliography 1951-1995,” in The Cavell Reader, edited by Stephen Mulhall (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, Ltd., 1996), 390–414. ISBN 978-0631-19743-0. [Invited.]
  • “The Rights of Property Can’t Be Unlimited,” Roanoke Times (Sunday, 29 July 1996), commentary.
  • With Michael Payne, “Stanley Cavell: A Bibliography, 1958–1994,” in Stanley Cavell, Philosophical Passages: Wittgenstein, Emerson, Austin, Derrida (Oxford: Basil Blackwell Ltd., 1995), 187–97. ISBN 978-0631-19271-8. [Invited.]
  • “Conservatives Should Own Up to Their Share of the Blame,” Roanoke Times & World News (Saturday, 6 May 1995).
  • “Doubt and Divinity: Cicero’s Influence on Hume’s Religious Skepticism,” Hume Studies 20 (April 1994): 103–20.
  • “’Real’ Parents are Daily Care-Givers,” Roanoke Times & World News (Friday, 19 November 1993), A19.
  • “Empiricism, Difference, and Common Life,” Man and World [now Continental Philosophy Review] 26 (1993): 319–28. A review essay addressing Gilles Deleuze’s Empiricism and Subjectivity: An Essay on Hume’s Theory of Human Nature, translated by Constantin V. Boundas (New York: Columbia University Press, 1991).
  • “A Working Bibliography on Stanley Cavell,” in The Senses of Stanley Cavell, edited by Richard Fleming and Michel Payne, Bucknell Review 32.1 (1989): 322–34. ISBN 978-0838751466. [Invited.]
  • “Situating Schopenhauer and Freud in the Kantian Tradition,” Mind and Nature 1 (Fall 1987), 103–17. Also published in Eidos: The Bucknell Academic Journal 3 (1987), 61–73.

Publications: Book Reviews

  • Book Review of Bredo Johnsen, Righting Epistemology: Hume’s Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press) in The Journal of Scottish Philosophy 17.2 (2019): 175–89. [Invited.]

  • Book Review of Graciela De Pierris, Ideas, Evidence, and Method: Hume’s Skepticism and Naturalism concerning Knowledge and Causation (Oxford: Oxford University Press) in The International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 9 (April 2019): 345–56.[Invited.] https://doi.org/10.1163/22105700-20191361

  • Book Review of Donald C. Ainslie, Hume’s True Scepticism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015) in The International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 8 (2018): 348–52. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of Ryu Susato, Hume’s Sceptical Enlightenment (Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press, 2015) in The Journal of the History of Philosophy 55.1 (January 2017), 165-66. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of John Christian Laursen & Gianni Paganini, eds., Skepticism and Political Thought in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2015) in The Journal of the History of Philosophy 54.4 (October 2016): 682-83. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of Kevin Meeker, Hume’s Radical Scepticism and the Fate of Naturalized Epistemology (London: Routledge, 2012) in The International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 5.3 (2015): 263-68. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of David Hume, A Treatise of Human Nature, vols. 1 &2 of The Clarendon Edition of the Works of David Hume edited by David Fate Norton and Mary J. Norton (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 2007) in The Journal of the History of Philosophy 46.2 (April 2008): 325-26. [Invited.]
  • Symposium Essay, “On the 2007 Clarendon Critical Edition of David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature,” Hume Studies 33.2 (November 2007), 289-96. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of Judith Jennings, Gender, Religion, and Radicalism in the Long Eighteenth Century: The ‘Ingenious Quaker’ and her Connections (Hampshire: Ashgate, 2006) in 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 15 (2008): 389-92.
  • Book Review of Enlightenment Aberrations: Error & Revolution in France by David W. Bates (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002) in Eighteenth-Century Current Bibliography [Invited.]
  • Book review of Alain Cabantous, Blasphemy: Its History in the West from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Century, translated by Eric Rauth (New York: Columbia University Press, 2005) in 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 11 (2006): 233-38. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of The Monster in the Machine: Magic Medicine and the Marvelous in the Time of the Scientific Revolution by Zakiya Hanafi (Durham: Duke University Press, 2000) in 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 9 (2003): 366-70. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of New Essays on The Rationalists, edited by Rocco J. Gennaro & Charles Huenemann (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999) in 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 8 (2003). [Invited.]
  • Book Review of Ethical Know-How: Action, Wisdom, and Cognition by Francisco J. Varela (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999) in Ethics. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of English Epicures and Stoics: Ancient Legacies in Early Stuart Culture by Reid Barbour (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1998) in 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 7 (2002): 409-11. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of Gassendi’s Ethics: Freedom in a Mechanistic Universe by Lisa Sarasohn (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996) in 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era 6 (2002): 349-52. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of The Just Family by Richard Dien Winfield (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998) in Ethics 110.3 (April 2000): 665-66. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of Groundless Knowledge: A Humean Solution to the Problem of Scepticism by Henrik Bohlin (Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell International, 1997) in The Review of Metaphysics 53.1 no. 209 (September 1999): 144-45. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of Truth and Progress, Philosophical Papers, vol. 3, by Richard Rorty (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), in The Philosophers’ Magazine 5 (Winter 1999): 58-59. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of Making Room: The Economics of Homelessness by Brendan O’Flaherty (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1996), in The Journal of American Culture 21.1 (Spring 1998): 101-02. Also published 17 July 1997 on H-Net and H-PCAACA (Popular Culture and American Culture Associations) as well as on 5 August 1997 on H-Urban, edited by Mark Peel (© 1997 by H-Net and the Popular Culture and the American Culture Associations).
  • Book Review of Political Theory for Mortals: Shades of Justice, Images of Death by John A. Seery (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996) in Philosophy in Review / Comptes rendus philosophiques 17.5 (October 1997): 387-89.
  • Book Review of The David Hume Library by David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (Edinburgh: Edinburgh Bibliographical Society & The National Library of Scotland, 1996), in Eighteenth-Century Scotland: Book Review Supplement (Spring 1997): 35-36. [Invited.]
  • Book Review of The Culture Industry Revisited: Theodor W. Adorno on Mass Culture by Deborah Cook (Lanham, MD: Rowan & Littlefield, 1996) in Philosophy in Review / Comptes rendus philosophiques 17.1 (January 1997): 16-18.
  • Book Review of The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice Christopher Hitchens (New York: Verso, 1995) in The Journal of Popular Culture 23.3 (Fall 2000): 115-16. Also published 28 November 1996 on H-Net (© 1996 by H-Net and the Popular Culture and the American Culture Associations).
  • Book Review of Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume’s Way of Naturalizing Responsibility by Paul Russell (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995) in Eighteenth-Century Scotland: Book Review Supplement (Spring 1996): 8. [Invited.]

Invited Lectures, Colloquia, Interviews

  • Participant at the John William Miller Colloquium, Williams College, Williamstown, MA, 31 October – 4 November 2018.
  • Participant at the John William Miller Colloquium, Williams College, Williamstown, MA, 9-12 November 2017.
  • “Critical Thinking and Scepticism across the Arts and Sciences: In Dialogue with the African Academy” CECTRRA (Center for Critical Thinking and Resourceful Research in Africa), University of Abuja, Nigeria, 11 July 2016.
  • “Skepticism, Naturalism, and Nihilism,” The William F. Edwards Memorial Undergraduate Philosophy Lecture. Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 22 October 2015.
  • “Hume’s Doxastic Scepticism,” Oxford Hume Forum, Hertford College, Oxford University, 2 December 2014.
  • “Hume and the Promise of Philosophy,” Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, 19 November 2013.
  • “The Way Hume Saves Philosophy through Critical History,” Workshop on Philosophy in the Enlightenment, organized by Hume Society president Jackie Taylor (San Francisco), with Cristina Paoletti (Bologna), Lorenzo Greco (Oxford), Emilio Mazza (Milan), Willem Lemmens (Antwerp, IASH), Alissa MacMillan (Toulouse). The Scots Kirk of Paris, 23 October 2013.
  • “Hume’s Way of Saving Philosophy through Sceptical and Critical History.” University of Edinburgh Philosophy Department Lecture Series, 4 October 2013.
  • Appeared on KET to debate John Garren, professor and chair of the University of Kentucky Economics program about raising the minimum wage. Part of KET’s “Poverty in Kentucky” series, hosted by Renee Shaw. Aired originally 17 June 2013, rebroadcast on WUKY, public radio
  • Interviewed by Hanna Ender on DRadio Wissen, German Public Radio, for a program celebrating the 15th anniversary of the release of The Big Lebowski and to discuss The Big Lebowski and Philosophy. Broadcast 26 March 2013. http://wissen.dradio.de
  • Commentary on Minh Nguyen’s, “The Importance of Self-Knowledge,” 2013 Kentucky Philosophical Association meeting, March 23, Transylvania University.
  • “Hume’s Progressive Appeal to Custom,” California State University, Chico, November 5, 2012.
  • Interviewed on “Nancy’s Bookshelf,” Northstate Public Radio, 5 November 2012, with Troy Jollimore and Robert C. Jones. http://kchofm.podbean.com/2012/12/14/peter-fosl-robert-jones-troy-jollimore/; interview published in Nancy’s Bookshelp: Conversations with Writers (2013).
  • “Leadership and Lebowski: What We Can Learn from an Old Hippy and the History of Philosophy,” Christian Care Communities, 2 November 2012. Wooded Glen Retreat Center, Henryville, IN.
  • Interviewed on WFPL (Free Public Library) Louisville about The Big Lebowski and Philosophy, July 16, 2012.
  • Interviewed on WUTC (University of Tennessee Chattanooga Public Radio) about The Big Lebowski and Philosophy, July 13, 2012.
  • “The Moral Imperative to Rebel Against God,” Centre College, 28 September 2010. Presented at Transylvania University 18 November 2010.
  • Interviewed with Philosophy Compass, May 2010. http://thephilosopherseye.com/2010/05/24/interview-the-philosopher’s-toolkit/
  • Commentary on Clint Jones (University of Kentucky), “Mechonocracy and Modern Society,” Kentucky Philosophical Association, 17 April 2010. Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY.
  • “Philosophy and Art,” University of Louisville, 2 April 2010. Addressing Prof. Ying Kit Chan’s class in advanced drawing.
  • Guest lecture on Lost and Philosophy, “Friends and Enemies in the State of Nature,” 3 March 2010. St. Catherine’s School, Richmond, VA.
  • Commentary on the Clarendon Critical edition of David Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature, 2 vols., edited by David Fate Norton and Mary J. Norton (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 2007) at the 34th Hume Conference, Boston University. 12 August 2007. A special session including David Fate Norton (McGill University), John Bricke (University of Kansas), and Jacqueline Taylor (University of San Francisco).
  • “The ‘Nature’ of Hume’s Skepticism,” American Philosophical Association Pacific Meeting, Portland, Oregon. March 2006. Part of a panel with Don Garrett (New York University) and Paul Russell (University of British Columbia) on Hume’s naturalism, organized by Joseph Keim Campbell (Washington State University).
  • “The Trial of Socrates,” Governor’s School, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Kentucky (July 2005); a dramatic recreation in period costume where I present a speech for the defense and my colleague, ancient historian Frank Russell, gives a speech for the prosecution. The audience votes using black and white pebbles.
  • “Come into the Garden: Rumi,” with composer Greg Partain, Governor’s School, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Kentucky. July 2005.
  • “Hume’s Skeptical Naturalism: How both Deleuze and Popkin Got it Wrong.” University of Louisville Colloquium Series. Louisville, Kentucky. 1 November 2004.
  • “Can Naturalism Be a form of Skepticism?” Inland Northwest Philosophy Confernce. Washington State University; Pulllman, Washington, 1 May 2004.
  • Invited participant on panel to discuss film, The Trial of Henry Kissinger, University of Louisville. 15 April 2003.
  • “Just War Theory, the War in Iraq, and the War on Terrorism.” Sayre School, for the Rick O’Neil Philosophical Society. 3 April 2003.
  • “Skepticism in Wittgenstein’s On Certainty.” A live webcast tele-lecture and discussion with Joseph Keim Campbell’s seminar on “Skepticism” at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington; delivered from the University of Kentucky via live, interactive Internet link. October 2002.
  • “The Accomplishment of Women in Early Modern Philosophy.” Convocation Lecture. Cumberland College, Williamsburg, Kentucky. 24 September 2002.
  • “God, Reason, and Science in Hume and the Deists.” Phi Alpha Theta (history honorary society) lecture. Cumberland College, Williamsburg, Kentucky; 25 September 2002.
  • “Cracks in the Cement of the Universe.” Philosophy Department Lecture Series. University of Cincinnati. 30 November 2001.
  • “Hume on Science and Imagination.” Address delivered in honor of the opening of the Noel Collection of 18th-century documents and artifacts. Louisiana State University, Shreveport, Louisiana. 8 November 2001.
  • “Aristotle’s Ethics.” Bellarmine University. Louisville, Kentucky. 3 January 2001.
  • “God, the Devil, and You.” A Debate between Drs. Peter S. Fosl (Transylvania University) and Jerry Wallis (Asbury Theological Seminary) on the problem of evil and the existence of God. The Singletary Center of the University of Kentucky. 25 April 2000. Sponsored by Southland Christian Church.
  • “The Claim of Skepticism: An Interpretation of David Hume’s View of Knowledge.” Bennett-Bernard Auditorium of Asbury College, Willmore, Kentucky. 14 March 2000.
  • “The Claim of Skepticism: Hume, Sextus Empiricus, Wittgenstein, and Cavell.” University of Kentucky Department of Philosophy Annual Lecture Series. University of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky. 25 February 2000.
  • Commentary on David Lee Miller’s, “The Father’s Witness: Patriarchal Images of Boys.” University of Kentucky Social Theory Group, Gaines Center for the Humanities/Commonwealth House. 7 October 1999. David Lee Miller is Professor of English and Dean of the College of Humanities at the University of Kentucky.
  • Commentary on Keith Drommis (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), “What Does a Good Ground Look Like? Wittgenstein’s Response to the Skepticism.” Colloquium on Skepticism, chair Michael Hodges (Vanderbilt University). Central Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, New Orleans, Louisiana. 7 May 1999.
  • Chair of Hume Society Session. American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting. Speakers: James Shelley (Augustana College) “Reason and Normativity in Hume’s Theory of Taste”; and Karann Durland (Austin College), “Hume on Primary and Secondary Qualities.” New Orleans, Louisiana, 7 May 1999.
  • “Hume, Wittgenstein, and Cavell on Nature and Convention.” Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky. 2 February 1998.
  • Liberty Fund Colloquium on “Personal and Political Liberty in the Book of Mormon” Salt Lake City, UT. 11-14 September 1997.
  • Liberty Fund Colloquium on “David Hume and Human Excellence.” Charleston, SC. 6-9 March 1997.
  • “Philosophy’s Place in the Liberal Arts Curriculum.” Oxford College of Emory University, Oxford, Georgia. 14 February 1997.
  • “Can Men Be Feminists?” Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina. 3 February 1997.
  • “Major Themes in Modern Philosophy.” The University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. 29 January 1997.
  • Liberty Fund Socratic Seminar on Faith and Political Philosophy: The Correspondence Between Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin, 1934-64, The Liberty Fund; Indianapolis, Indiana. 3-5 November 1995.
  • “The Virtues and Vices of Name Mixing.” The Blue Ridge Onomastic Symposium, sponsored by the American Name Society. Roanoke City Library, Roanoke, Virginia. 22 April 1995.
  • “Hume’s Skepticism and the Legacy of Sextus Empiricus.” University of North Florida, Spring Philosophy Colloquium Series; Jacksonville, Florida. 24 January 1994.
  • Liberty Fund Colloquium on Michael Oakeshott’s On Human Conduct. St. Louis, Missouri;.12-15 June 1993.
  • “Ancient Skepticism and the Philosophy of Common Life.” Philosophy Forum, a colloquium series sponsored by the Department of Philosophy, Georgia State University; Atlanta, Georgia. 18 October 1991.
  • “Skepticism, Common Life, and the Intellectual Scene of Eighteenth-Century Edinburgh.” Emory Women’s Club; Atlanta, Georgia. 24 March 1992.

Lectures, Panels, Symposia, and other Public Appearances

  • “Hume’s Skeptical Beliefs: The Clitomachian Reading,” 43rd Hume Conference, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia, 21 July 2016.
  • Commentary on the “Intrinsic Value of the Least in Aldo Leopold’s Philosophy” by Bob Sandmeyer, Kentucky Philosophical Association, Bellarmine University, 16 April 2016.
  • “Style in Teaching Philosophy,” Symposium on Joseph P. Fell, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, 6 September 2014.
  • Commentary on Laura Nicolì’s “The Natural History of Religion‘s Legacy in Voltaire’s Writings” at the 41st International Hume Society Conference, 23 July 2014, Portland State University.
  • “Imagining the Self in the Films of Christopher Nolan,” Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association annual Conference, panel on the films of Christopher Nolan, chair James M. Okapal. Chicago, IL, 19 April 2014.
  • “Hume, Animals, and Skepticism,” part of a panel organized by Karann Durland, “Like Animals,” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Williamsburg, VA, 31 March – 3 April 2014.
  • “Hume’s new edition of the Treatise and the fictive materiality of the new Hume,” British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, St. Hugh’s College, Oxford University, 9 January 2014.
  • “Scepticism, Habit, and ‘Common Life’ in Hume” conference on “The Ordinary/Everyday/Quotidian,” sponsored by the Center for Modern Studies, York University, 26 September 2013.
  • “Habit, Custom, History, and Hume’s Critical Philosophy” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS). Vancouver, Canada. 18 March 2011.
  • “Habit, Custom, History, and Hume’s Critical Philosophy” South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SCSECS). St. Simons Island, GA. 19 February 2011.
  • With Julian Baggini, “Philosophy Workshop,” Bristol Festival of Ideas; Bristol, England. 15 May 2010.
  • “Hume’s Pyrrhonian and Academic Skepticisms,” Mid-South Philosophy Conference, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. 5 March 2010.
  • Commentary on Emily M. Kelahan’s paper, “What’s the Big Idea?” Mid-South Philosophy Conference, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. 5 March 2010.
  • “Skepticism and the Possibility of Nature,” Coloquio International sobre el Pirronismo Antiguo y su influencia en la Filosopfia Moderna y Contemporanea, Universidad Nacional de Lanús y la Biblioteca Nacional, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 7 August 2008.
  • Appeared in feature documentary film Seven Signs (2007) by J. D. Wilkes and Blake Judd. Seven Signs is a film about the American south and southern music.
  • “The Nature of Humean Nature,” Kentucky Philosophical Association, Bellarmine University. 3 November 2007.
  • “Hume’s Skepticism and Early American Deism,” 4th International Reid Symposium, Center for the Study of Scottish Philosophy (CSSP), Princeton Theological Seminary. 8 September 2007.
  • “Come into the Garden: Rumi,” with composer and pianist Greg Partain and soprano Hope Koehler, Governor’s School, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Kentucky. July 2005.
  • “The Trial of Socrates,” Governor’s School, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Krentucky. July 2005.
  • “Come into the Garden: Rumi,” with composer and pianist Greg Partain and soprano Hope Koehler; Lexington, Kentucky, Unitarian Universalist Church (15 November 2004), the Carrick Theater of Transylvania University. 16 November 2004.
  • Commentary on Wendell Berry’s presentation, “In the Presence of Fear,” Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky. 12 September 2004.
  • “A Tale of Three Islands: Easter, St. Kilda, Hilton Head,” part of the Integrative Study of the Bioeconomy Colloquia, organized by Professor Joe Engelberger. University of Kentucky. Lexington, KY. 2004.
  • “Re-Trial of Socrates”, with Associate Professor of History Frank Russell, Carrick Auditorium, Transylvania University. 25 September 2003
  • “Hume’s Skeptical Naturalism,” XXXth Annual International Hume Conference, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV. Commentary by Kenneth Richman, Bryn Mawr College. 29 July 2003. (Blind Review.)
  • Participant on panel to discuss film, The Trial of Henry Kissinger. Floyd Theater, University of Louisville. 15 April 2003.
  • “Just War Theory, The War in Iraq, and The War on Terrorism.” Sayre School presentation, organized by Don Bell with Rick O’Neil Philosophical Society. 3 April 2003.
  • “Turkey: The Complexities of Human Rights,” Academic Affairs Presentation. Transylvania University. Lexington, Kentucky. 9 November 2000.
  • “Morality, Sex, and Extraterrestrials: A Humean Perspective” (an homage to Dr. Kevin Cope). XXVth and Millennial Convention of the South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SCSECS), chairs Eva Dadlez and James Mock (University of Central Oklahoma). Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 10 March 2000.
  • Wye Faculty Seminar, “Citizenship in the American Polity.” Sponsored by the Aspen Institute. Wye Woods Conference Center, Maryland. 8-14 August 1999.
  • Commentary on Timothy Costelloe’s (Emory University, now William and Mary), “General Rules and Common Sense in Hume’s Aesthetics.” Mid-South Philosophy Conference, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee. 5 March 1999.
  • “Hume’s Skepticism and Critique of Skepticism.” Academic Affairs Presentation. Transylvania University. Lexington, Kentucky. 18 February 1999.
  • “The Contingency of Nations.” Committee on Social Theory at the University of Kentucky, Conference on “Nation Theory,” panel on “Territory, Politics, and Concepts of the National,” chair Doug Slaymaker (University of Kentucky); University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. 13 November 1998.
  • “The Languages of Commerce in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy and Literature.” Panel Organized & Chaired for the Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) Conference; Atlanta, GA. 7 March 1998. Panel participants: Tom Lavazzi (Savannah State University), Mary Peace (Nottingham University, U.K.), Charles E. Gobin (Asbury College).
  • “Hume’s Pyrrhonism and his Critique of Pyrrhonism Reconsidered.” Part of a Panel on “Hume, Vico, and Kant,” Chair Stephen Strange, Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) Conference; Atlanta, GA. 6 March 1998.
  • APA Symposium presentation: “Hume, Wittgenstein, and Cavell on Nature and Convention,” American Philosophical Association (APA Eastern Division Meeting; Philadelphia, PA. 27-29 December 1997. Commentaries by Ted Cohen (University of Chicago) and James Conant (University of Pittsburgh). (Blind review.)
  • “Hume’s Pyrrhonism and his Critique of Pyrrhonism Reconsidered.” Part of a panel, “Hume and Ancient Philosophy,” I organized for the Hume Society. Other panelists include Donald W. Livingston (Emory University) and Marie Martin (Clemson University). Meeting of the Hume Society at the Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association (APA); Philadelphia, PA. 27-29 December 1997,
  • “The Humean Self and the Language of Commerce.” Part of a panel I organized with Dr. William Walker (Dept. English, University of Canterbury, New Zealand) on the topic, “Aesthetics, Commerce, and Culture in Eighteenth-Century Britain.” Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies (GEMGS); University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. 4-7 December 1997.
  • With Dr. Debra Nails (Mary Washington College): workshop on “Teaching Early Modem Women Philosophers.” Conference on “Attending to Early Modern Women: Crossing Boundaries,” sponsored by the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies; the University of Maryland at College Park. 6-9 November 1997. (Juried.)
  • “The Way We Ought to Be.” Lecture delivered as part of a panel, “Perspectives on the Future,” closing a month-long symposium entitled, “Perspectives on the Family: Reflections on the Past, Predictions for the Future.” Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, VA. 4 October 1997.
  • “Convention and Nature in Cavell, Wittgenstein, and Hume.” XXIVth International Hume Conference; Monterey, California. 29 July – 2 August 1997. Commentary by Christopher Williams (University of Nevada Reno). (Blind review.)
  • “Miracles and Natural Laws in Ethan Allen and Hume.” Mid-South Philosophy Conference, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. 28 February – 1 March 1997. Commentary by Steven DeCaroli (Binghamton University). (Blind review.)
  • Commentary on “Hume’s Beliefs,” by Kaveh Kamooneh, Georgia State University. Mid-South Philosophy Conference, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee. 28 February -1 March 1997.
  • “Hume as Modernist and Anti-Modernist.” Southeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (SEASECS) Conference; The Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida. 29 February – 2 March 1996.
  • “Reason, Morals, and Animals in Hume.” Twenty-Second International Hume Conference; Park City, Utah. 25-29 July 1995. Commentary by Tatsuya Sakamoto (Keio University). (Blind review,)
  • Commentary on “Hume and the American Deists on Miracles,” by James Dye, University of Northern Illinois, Conference on “Hume and ISth-Century America,” sponsored by the Hume Society, the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society, and the Institute for Early American History and Culture; The College of William and Mary; Williamsburg, Virginia. 6-8 April 1995.
  • “Animality, Rationality, and Monstrosity.” 18th Annual Conference of the Northeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (NEASECS), Fordham University at Lincoln Center; New York City. 6-9 October 1994.
  • “Hume’s Skepticism and the Legacy of Sextus Empiricus.” XXIst International Hume Conference, Universita di Roma La Sapienza; Rome, Italy. 21 June 1994. Commentary by Doreen Silver (University of Toronto). (Blind review.)
  • “Selves in Transit: Gain and Loss in the Films of Jim Jarmusch.” Conference on the Films of Jim Jarmusch, Hollins College. 2 April 1993.
  • Eros, Logos, and Kairos.” Symposium in Honor of Alvord Beardslee, Hollins College. 18 ApriI1993.
  • “Who was Columbus, And Should He Be Celebrated?” Presentation and Chair of Panel, Hollins College. 13 October 1992.
  • “The Ontological Limitations of Sartre’s Being and Nothingness.” Georgia Philosophical Society, Georgia State University; Atlanta, Georgia. April 1988.
  • “Remarks on ‘Form’ in Books Zeta, Eta, and Theta of Aristotle’s Metaphysics.” Southeastern Graduate Student Philosophy Conference, University of Georgia; Athens, Georgia. April 1988.
  • “Situating Schopenhauer and Freud in the Kantian Tradition.” Southeastern Graduate Student Philosophy Conference, University of Georgia; Athens, Georgia. April 1987.

Manuscripts Evaluated for the Following Journals and Publishers:

  • British Journal of the History of Philosophy
  • Journal of the History of Philosophy
  • The Philosophers’ Magazine
  • Hume Studies
  • The Journal of Transcendent Philosophy
  • Blackwell Publishers
  • Philosophy & Rhetoric
  • Hume Society
  • The Personalist Forum
  • Prentice Hall
  • Broadview Press
  • Stanford University Press
  • Pennsylvania State University Press
  • Continuum Publishers

Additional, Grants, Honors, Non-Teaching Appointments

Post-Doctoral:

  • Founder of Transylvania University’s bachelor’s degree program in PPE
  • Editor of FORsooth Newspaper (2011-13)
  • Received the honorific title, “Kentucky Colonel,” by Governor Ernie Fletcher, 2006.
  • Madison Who’s Who, 2006-07.
  • Nominated for CASE Carnegie Professor of the Year 2005 & 2006.
  • Monroe Moosnick Award for Service to the Transylvania University (2004).
  • ODK, national leadership honor society; inducted November 2002.
  • Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE) program, “Turkey: Transformations in Polity, Economy, and Religion.” June 2000; funded through a Jones Grant for Summer Research.
  • Wye Faculty Seminar (1999). The Aspen Institute, Wye River Conference Center, Queenstown, Maryland.
  • Dupont Technology Seminar (1999).
  • Selected for Who’s Who among America’s Teachers (1998, 2002).
  • Appointed Visiting Research Fellow at The Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities of The University of Edinburgh, Scotland; as part of the Institute’s European Enlightenment Project (1996).
  • Hollins College Research Award & Western Traditions Faculty Opportunity Grant for research at the National Library of Scotland (August 1996).
  • National Endowment for the Humanities, Summer Institute, “Modernity and Its Discontents,” University of California, San Diego; directed by Avrum Stroll, Robert Pippin, and Ron Berman (10 July – 4 August, 1995).
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Grant (1994), for developing and teaching a new course, PRC 155, “Nature and the Human.”
  • Western Traditions Faculty Opportunity Grant & Faculty Development Award for research in Rome, Italy (June 1994).
  • Jessie Ball du Pont Fund (1994), for work on curriculum reform regarding the issue of diversity.
  • Cabell Brand foundation (1993), to develop courses in women and philosophy as well as environmental philosophy; to help students make contact with female leaders in the Roanoke Valley; to organize the Hollins College Women’s Environmental Leadership Conference.

Graduate.

  • Lewis White Beck Fellowship, presented by Emory University to a graduate student for outstanding dissertation research (1991).
  • Emory Women’s Club Graduate Research Award^ presented to an Emory graduate student for dissertation research and excellence in scholarship.
  • Emory University’s Award for Excellence in Graduate Research in the Arts and Sciences (1989) for that year’s best paper and research project in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, my essay, “Skepticism in the Light of Comparison: Some Reflections on Hume, Wittgenstein, and Sextus Empiricus.”
  • George R. Woodruff Fellowship (1986-89) one of seven, full tuition and stipend fellowships awarded annually to students entering the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Emory.

Undergraduate:

  • Phi Beta Kappa (1985).
  • Preston Warren Award, presented by the Department of Philosophy to a student showing excellence and promise in philosophy (1985).
  • William C. Gretzinger Prize, for graduating with the highest standing in economics (1985).
  • Honors Thesis awards (1985):
  • Harold W. Miller Award, best honors thesis of the Class of 1985.
  • Agnes Archer Warren Award, excellence in interdisciplinary studies.
  • Omicron Delta Epsilon, economics honor society (1984).
  • Phi Eta Sigma, freshman honor society (1982).

Faculty Appointments and Teaching Experience

Kentucky Institute for International Studies (Summer 2010): Yediteppe University, Istanbul

  • Islamic Philosophy

Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky. Bingham Professor of Philosophy and Chair of Philosophy Program (September 1998 – 2006): 17 courses.

  • UNIV 1111: First-year Mentoring & Advising.
  • FLA 1004: Foundations of the Liberal Arts I & II.
  • PHIL 1024: Introduction to Philosophy.
  • PPE 1024: Introduction to PPE
  • PHIL 1154: Practical Logic.
  • PHIL 2004: Feminist Philosophies.
  • PHIL 2084: Environmental Philosophy, May Term on Mountaintop Removal.
  • PHIL 2294: Radical Political Philosophies, Left & Right (May 1999).
  • PHIL 2294: Plato’s Republic (May 2000).
  • PHIL 2294: The Ancient Polis (May 2001, 05, 09); in Greece & Turkey.
  • PHIL 2294: Race, Reform, and Evolution (May 2007, May 2017).
  • PHIL 2294: Anarchism and Marxism.
  • PHIL 2294: Aesthetics.
  • PHIL 2294: Philosophy of Law.
  • PHIL 2294: Eating Paris (in Paris, May 2011).
  • PHIL 2204: Pacifism, Nonviolence, and Just War Theory.
  • PHIL 2304: Major Thinkers: Wittgenstein.
  • PHIL 2514: History of Ancient Philosophy (Pre-Socratics to Plotinus).
  • PHIL 2534: Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (Augustine – Bruno).
  • PHIL 2544: History of Early Modern Philosophy (Bacon – Kant).
  • PHIL 3054: Philosophy of Religion.
  • PHIL 3304: Stanley Cavell and Film Theory.
  • PHIL 3304: David Hume
  • PHIL 3054: Philosophy of Religion.
  • PHIL 3144: Existentialism.
  • PHIL 3404: Epistemology.
  • PHIL 3424: Metaphysics.
  • PHIL 3554: Nineteenth-Century Philosophy.
  • PHIL 4014: Recent Philosophy.
  • PHIL 4444: Senior Seminar.
  • LSAT Preparatory Course (May Term ] 999; 2006).

Hollins College, Roanoke, Virginia. Assistant & Associate Professor of Philosophy (July 1992 – June 1999): 22 courses

  • PHIL 120: Critical Thinking (informal logic plus intensive writing of preçis and critical essays).
  • PHIL 130: Current Events Seminar (1 credit course; weekly discussion group appealing to philosophical theories to interpret current events).
  • PHIL 155: Nature and the Human (team-taught course with Professor of Chemistry Daniel Derringer, a course examining the way in which changing conceptions of nature have altered humanity’s self-understanding: Aristotle, Galileo, Descartes, Darwin, quantum mechanics, and relativity theory).
  • PHIL 181: Contemporary Moral Issues/Medical Ethics (a survey and examination of central issues in bioethics).
  • PHIL 182: Environmental Ethics (a survey and examination of central issues in environmental ethics).
  • PHIL 202: Early Modern Philosophy (Descartes through Kant, including the Scottish Common Sense School, Moral Sense theorists, and female philosophers of the period).
  • PHIL 208: Feminist Philosophies (comprehensive survey of the principal philosophical schools of feminist philosophical thought; includes feminist epistemologies).
  • PHIL 211: Symbolic Logic (categorical, prepositional, and first-order predicate logic).
  • PHIL 252: Ethical Theory (comprehensive historical survey of major schools of ethical thought).
  • PHIL 254:   Social-Political Philosophy (examination of the nature and purpose of the state; Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Paine, Marx, Goldman).
  • PHIL 265: Philosophy of the Family (analysis of the concepts of the family and the child in Western philosophy; assessment of the various rights and duties of family members; examination of the relation of the family to civil society and the state: Stephanie Coontz, MichEle Barret & Mary Mclntosh, Lawrence Houlgate.
  • PHIL 302: Epistemology & Metaphysics (selections from: Derrida, Austin, Wittgenstein, Quine, Rorty, Heidegger, Hegel, Aquinas, Aristotle, Plotinus).
  • PHIL 304: Nineteenth-Century Continental Philosophy (Schopenhauer, Hegel, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Marx).
  • PHIL 316: Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy (Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida, Foucault, et al.).
  • PHIL 350: Hellenistic Philosophy (Cicero, Lucretius, Sextus Empiricus, Plotinus, Epictetus, Augustine).
  • PHIL 3 80: Great Thinkers in Philosophy: Hume.
  • PHIL 400: Senior Seminar.
  • HUM 544C: The Human Search For Meaning (Camus, John Barth, Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, Lucretius, Walker Percy, Sartre, Etty Hillesum, Alice Koeller, and Alice Walker {Master of Arts in Liberal Studies core literature course]).
  • ST-7 (January Term): Radical Political Economy (Marx, Goldman, Lenin, Hilferding, Dobb., Apffel-Margltrv Michael Hudson. With Professor of Economics Drucilla Barker).
  • FP-9 (January Term): Understanding the Natural World (John McPhee, Lorainne Anderson, Gilgamesh, Euripides).
  • FP-15 (January Term): Eco-Philosophy (an examination of the concept of nature in traditional and contemporary texts, including: John McPhee, Edward Abbey, Erazim Kohak, and Carolyn Merchant).
  • FP-17 (January Term): Women and Leadership (examining the lives of Eleanor Roosevelt, Septima Clark, Ida B. Wells, Mother Bloor, and Anne Braden as well as reading selections from Plato, Carol Gilligan, Sara Ruddick, and Machiavelli).

 Emory University, Instructor (1991-92):

  • PHIL 250: History of Western Thought: Ancient Greece to the Middle Ages. Readings and lectures focus on Plato, Aristotle, Sextus Empiricus, Augustine, and Aquinas.
  • PHIL 110: Introduction to Logic. An introduction to the basic concepts of informal and formal logic, including predicate and modal logic.

 Georgia State University, Instructor (Spring Term 1990, three terms 1991-92):

  • PHIL 141: Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking. This class not only introduces basic concepts of formal and informal logic, statistical methods, and causal reasoning but also aims to train students to write articulate, persuasive, and well reasoned essays.

Assistantships:

Emory University

  • Military Ethics (Autumn 1989). Graduate Assistant to Professor Nicholas Fotion. (Responsible for grading, review sessions, and occasional lecturing.)
  • Research Assistant to Professor Richard Patterson (Spring 1990), for his book on Aristotle’s modal logic.

Bucknell University:

  • Introduction to Logic (academic year 1985-86). Teaching Assistant to Professor Richard Fleming. (Responsible for grading and review sessions.)
  • Micro and Macroeconomics (academic years 1984-86). Teaching Assistant to Professor Michael Moohr. (Responsible for grading and review sessions.)

Community Service

Transylvania University:

  • Chair, Philosophy Program (F 1999-)
  • August Term Planing Sub-Committee (2016)
  • Judicial Council (2015-)
  • Faculty Finance Committee (2015-)
  • Faculty Concerns Committee (2007-09, chair 09)
  • Personnel Committee (2004-06)
  • Long-Range Planning Committee (2002-03)
  • Appeals Committee (2002-04)
  • Committee on Faculty Concerns (W1999-2002, W2008-09)
  • Writing Assessment Committee (2003-04)
  • Diversity Committee (2001-; Chair 2003-04)
  • Environmental Studies Minor (ESM) (1999-)
  • Quality Enhancement Plan Diversity Subcommittee / SACS Review (W2001)
  • Sexual Grievance Committee (2002-06)
  • Vice President of Transylvania University AAUP (2002)
  • T. Young Scholarship Selection Committee (2001, 2002)
  • Faculty Representative to Finance Liaison to the Board of Trustees (W 1999-2000)
  • Webmaster for Philosophy Program (F98-)
  • Special Assistant to Faculty Technology Seminar (2002)
  • University 1111 mentor (F 1999-W2002; 03-04)
  • Habitat for Humanities (2001, 2002)
  • Board for the Advancement of Student Research Committee (BASR) (F1999-2001)
  • Humanities Technology Committee (HUTECO) (1999-2000)
  • Women’s History Month Planning Committee (W 1999-06)
  • Organizer: Philosophy Lecture Series (1998-)
  • Organizer: Humanities Film Series (1998)
  • Advisor: Sophia, The Philosophical Society (1998-)
  • Advisor: Women’s Issues Group (1999)
  • Holleian Society member (W 1999-); President (2000-01, 2005-06)
  • Liaison to UK Social Theory Group (1998-03)
  • Advisor to Eide: The Transylvania University Online Journal of Philosophy.
  • Editorial consultant to Alterity, the student academic & creative journal (1999)

Hollins College;

  • 20/20 Board of Trustees-Faculty Strategic Planning Committee;
  • 20/20 Finance Sub-Committee;
  • 20/20 New Programs Sub-Committee (1996-97).
  • Executive Committee (1994-96).
  • Human Relations Committee (1995-96).
  • Elections Committee (1993-95).
  • Communications Committee (1997-98).
  • Advisor: Hollins Scholars honors program/Merit Scholarship Committee (1993-96)
  • Advisor & founder: Phi Sigma Tau, Virginia Theta, philosophy honor society(1997-98).
  • Advisor: Sophia, The Hollins College Philosophy Club (1993- 1996).
  • Director: Western Traditions Elective Program (1994- 96).\
  • Secretary: Phi Beta Kappa, Virginia lota (1993- 96; 1997-98).
  • Secretary: Humanities Division I (1992- 96).
  • Served on committees to develop interdisciplinary studies programs at Hollins (the Pathways Elective Program) in Environmental Studies, Women’s Studies, and the Western Traditions.
  • Roanoke Youth Soccer Association (F 1996, 1997).

Professional Organizations

  • American Philosophical Association (APA)
  • Hume Society
  • International Society for the Study of Scepticism (ISSS)
  • American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS)
  • Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society (ECSSS)
  • American Culture Association (ACA)
  • American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT)
  • American Association of University Professors (AAUP)
  • Friends Association for. Higher-Education (FAHE)
  • Concerned Philosophers for Peace (CCCP).

Language Competence

  • German: reading knowledge, competent in basic translation.
  • French: reading knowledge, competent in basic translation.
  • Attic Greek,

References

Prof. Jack Furlong: Chair, Department of Philosophy, 300 North Broadway, Transylvania University, Lexington, KY 40508

jfurlong@transy.edu • (859) 233-8160

Prof. Zoé Strecker: Department of Fine Arts, 300 North Broadway, Transylvania University, Lexington, KY 40508

zstrecker@transy.edu • (859) 233-8246

Prof. Frank Russell: Department of Classics, Chair of Social Sciences, 300 North Broadway, Transylvania University, Lexington, KY 40508

frussell@transy.edu • (859) 233-8230

Prof. Pauline Phemister: Department of Philosophy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

P.Phemister@ed.ac.uk • +441316513747